An Immigration Enforcement officer raids a migrant's home.

“Trust us, we will treat EU citizens fairly” is likely to evoke some pretty bitter laughs around the negotiating table.

The stories have not lost their capacity to shock, even as their numbers have grown:

The man who came here as a child, yet was told to leave immediately, after sixty years in Britain.

The elderly woman, a former chef from the House of Commons restaurant, sent to a detention centre and threatened with deportation to Jamaica, a country she hasn’t seen since she was ten.

The elderly man thrown out of his council home, and refused cancer treatment.

This is the grim harvest of wrecked lives produced as the government’s “hostile environment” policies – which require doctors, employers, landlords and schools to check the immigration status of all who use their services – are applied to the “Windrush generation”: immigrants who came to Britain from the Commonwealth, often actively recruited by the government at a time when little or no paperwork was required to do so.

People who have been in Britain legally for decades – but have no formal papers confirming this – are being treated as potential criminals by the government, because its predecessors didn’t document their arrival or record their status.

The current Conservative government has made it an article of faith that the British public would back any policy designed to make life difficult for immigrants, however cruel, inept or inflexible.

The growing public backlash to the “Windrush crisis” – intense enough for the Daily Mail to join in with attacking the government – belies this assumption.

The reason is quite simple: the policy falls well foul of what British voters, even those with serious reservations about immigration, think is fair.

This is underlined by polling from the British Social Attitudes survey which, a few years ago, asked people how long immigrants who play by the rules and pay their taxes should have to wait before receiving full political and social rights. Eight out of ten said such people should have full rights after five years, and nine out of ten would grant them after ten years.

The “Windrush” immigrants caught up in the current crisis have typically been here 50 years – and arrived as citizens with full rights in the first place. There is simply no meaningful public support for the way they are being treated.

It gets worse for the Conservatives, for not only is this policy universally …read more

Source:: New Statesman

      

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