The tragic death of Olympic skier Bode Miller’s 19-month-old daughter on Sunday has cast new light on the dangers of drowning – which is the no. 2 cause of death among young children in the United States.

Emeline Miller drowned in a swimming pool during a pool party in Orange County, California, Miller said in a statement.

“Our baby girl, Emmy, passed away yesterday. Never in a million years did we think we would experience a pain like this,” he posted to Instagram. “Her love, her light, her spirit will never be forgotten. Our little girl loved life and lived it to it’s fullest everyday. Our family respectfully requests privacy during this painful time.”

We are beyond devastated. Our baby girl, Emmy, passed away yesterday. Never in a million years did we think we would experience a pain like this. Her love, her light, her spirit will never be forgotten. Our little girl loved life and lived it to it’s fullest everyday. Our family respectfully requests privacy during this painful time.

A post shared by Bode Miller (@millerbode) on Jun 11, 2018 at 4:07pm PDT

Between 800 and 900 children drown every year in the United States, according the Centers for Disease Control. For children between ages 1 and 4, only birth defects cause more deaths than unintentional drowning. Of those deaths, most occur in home swimming pools.

According to the CDC, children ages 1 to 4 have the highest drowning rates. Drowning was responsible for one third of all accidental deaths for young children in 2014.

Pools can be dangerous because it only takes a few moments for a child to fall into the water and drown, said Emily Samuel, senior program manager at Safe Kids Worldwide, a nonprofit that aims to keep kids safe from accidental injury and death.

“Drowning is quick and silent so you wont hear cries for help or splashing like you would expect so its really important that parents take extra steps for safety,” she told TIME.

The CDC said the main factors that increase the risk of drowning include: lack of swimming ability, lack of barriers to prevent unsupervised water access, lack of close supervision while swimming, failure to wear life jackets and seizures.

Here’s what you can do to keep your kids safe around water this summer:

Designate an adult to watch children near water

Proper supervision is the single most important thing when it …read more

Source:: Time – Health

      

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Drowning Is the No. 2 Cause of Death for Young Children. Here’s How to Keep Your Kids Safe Around Pools

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