U.S. defender Kelly O'Hara (5) plays against New Zealand during the first half of an international friendly soccer match in Commerce City, Colo., Friday, Sept. 15, 2017.

U.S. defender Kelly O’Hara (5) plays against New Zealand during the first half of an international friendly soccer match in Commerce City, Colo., Friday, Sept. 15, 2017. | Jack Dempsey, AP

SALT LAKE CITY — In the hours after the International Olympic Committee and the Tokyo Organizing Committee announced the Olympics would be postponed until 2021, athletes responded almost universally with understanding and disappointment.

For many, another year of training poses difficult questions about careers and life choices. For others, the questions are simply whether or not they can remain at the top of their games for another year.

“Olympics might be postponed, but getting better is not! Control what you can control, and let the rest work itself out.” — Utah Royals defender Kelly O’Hara

Utah Royals defender Kelly O’Hara left no doubt about her intention to try and retain her place on the 2020 Olympic women’s soccer team. She shared an Instagram video of herself working out with this message: “Olympics might be postponed, but getting better is not! Control what you can control, and let the rest work itself out.”

That sentiment was echoed over and over by athletes across the country and from all sports.

Colleen Quigley, who hoped to compete in the 3,000-meter steeplechase in the 2020 Games, shared her thoughts on Instagram, offering a beautiful perspective.

“How am I feeling?” she wrote. “Very grateful and extremely lucky. As a distance runner, I feel grateful that I can still go outside and go for a run and do my workouts. I’ve been able to get most of my strength training done at home with a weight resistance bands and a yoga mat. I feel grateful for my health and the ability to continue to practice my sport.”

She continued, “Other people have not been as lucky with their health and are suffering in hospitals fighting for their lives. Other athletes have had to stop practicing their sport all together (swimmers, pole vaulters, wrestlers, soccer players, volleyball players…just to name a few) with no idea as to when they will be able to resume practice. Right now we should all be more concerned with the health of our world than excellence in sport. I’m excited to have the Olympic Games when this is all over as something we can look forward to as a celebration, whenever that may be.”

Her hashtag was #Tokyowhenever!

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Source:: Deseret News – Sports News

      

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Dreams deferred: Athletes understand but they’re still disappointed at Olympic postponement

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