A man fills a cup at a community water kiosk in Malawi.

Kettie Alinafe Harawa is the Malawi-based director of influence and scale at Water for People.
The nonprofit works to bring quality drinking water and sanitation services to countries in need. 
Harawa leads projects like tapping into groundwater and installing pumps and water infrastructure.
This article is part of the “Financing a Sustainable Future” series exploring how companies take steps to set and fund sustainable goals.

Access to clean water and better hygiene, sanitation, and water resource management is the “centerpiece” for solutions to poverty, gender equality, education, and hunger around the world, said Kettie Alinafe Harawa, the Malawi-based director of influence and scale at Water for People. In Malawi, Harawa is leading projects like tapping into groundwater and installing pumps and other water infrastructure.

Kettie Alinafe Harawa.

Founded in 1991 and headquartered in Denver, Colorado, the international nonprofit organization works in Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Bolivia, Peru, Rwanda, Uganda, and India, and has directors based in each of those countries.

To tackle the problem, Harawa works with local governments in Malawi and the national government, non-government organizations, and other groups to carry out Water for People’s mission to bring quality drinking water and sanitation services to Malawi long term that are sustained by communities, businesses, and governments.

The nonprofit funds local projects in part from donors like Charity:Water, Focusing Philanthropy, Latter-day Saint Charities, and the Sea Grape Foundation, which contributed more than $1 million in 2020. Other funding comes from individual and corporate donations and other fundraising. It also negotiates with partners like local governments, education and health departments, and communities, which help pay for water, sanitation, and hygiene projects in their areas.

“Water issues need to be solved first and everything else will follow,” Harawa told Insider.

In 2020, two billion people worldwide lacked safe drinking water, 3.6 billion lived without safely-managed sanitation, and 2.3 billion lacked basic hygiene — and 129 countries aren’t on track to have sustainably-managed water systems by 2030, according to the United Nations.

Many African countries, like Malawi, which is home to around 19 million people, experience water stress at higher rates than other parts of the world because of higher poverty levels and a lack of water infrastructure, and a World Resources Institute report suggests …read more

Source:: Business Insider

      

How a Malawi-based advocate is working to bring quality drinking water and sanitation services to the African nation

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