Five coho salmon swim in Lagunitas Creek near the Leo...

Five coho salmon swim in Lagunitas Creek near the Leo Cronin Fish Viewing Area in Lagunitas on Friday, Nov. 11, 2022. Endangered coho salmon runs have returned to Lagunitas Creek after recent rainfall. (Sherry LaVars/Marin Independent Journal)

Janet Cavanagh of Vermont looks for coho salmon in Lagunitas Creek on Thursday, Nov. 10, 2022, during a visit with her sister Sally Cavanagh of Woodacre. Endangered coho salmon runs have returned to Lagunitas Creek after recent rainfall. (Sherry LaVars/Marin Independent Journal)

A pair of coho salmon swim up Lagunitas Creek near the Leo Cronin Fish Viewing Area in Lagunitas, Calif., on Thursday, Nov. 10, 2022. Endangered coho salmon runs have returned to Lagunitas Creek after recent rainfall. (Sherry LaVars/Marin Independent Journal)

Sean Desmond of Sebastopol snaps photos of coho salmon in Lagunitas Creek near the Leo Cronin Fish Viewing Area in Lagunitas, Calif., on Thursday, Nov. 10, 2022. Desmond works in video production and grew up in San Anselmo. While he was a student at Archie Williams High School in 2002 he and some friends made a film called “Coho Crazy” at the creek. (Sherry LaVars/Marin Independent Journal)

A sign at the Leo Cronin Fish Viewing Area along Lagunitas Creek in Lagunitas, Calif., on Thursday, Nov. 10, 2022. Endangered coho salmon runs have returned to Lagunitas Creek after recent rainfall. (Sherry LaVars/Marin Independent Journal)

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Marin County residents and visitors can once again watch the natural spectacle of endangered coho salmon making their annual return to their spawning grounds in Lagunitas Creek this winter.

The rainfall this month was enough to signal the red-and-silver salmon to make their way from Tomales Bay — where they have been holding these past weeks — to begin the long journey against the currents of the creek.

“It’s an incredible spectacle to watch these fish leap waterfalls, hear them splash around as they maneuver up shallow riffle and witness the hooked-nose males fight for the opportunity to fertilize the female’s eggs in the nest she builds and protects until death,” said Ayano Hayes, a biologist with the Salmon Protection and Watershed Network, a nonprofit group based in Olema.

Through January, observers can watch coho salmon make their way up Lagunitas, San Geronimo and Redwood creeks at spots such as the Leo T. Cronin Fish Viewing Area, Samuel P. Taylor State Park and Roy’s Riffles in the San …read more

Source:: The Mercury News

      

Marin creeks get influx of coho salmon spawners after rains

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