A Trump supporters holds up a large QAnon sign while waiting in line to see President Donald J. Trump at his rally on August 2, 2018.

Many QAnon believers reacted angrily to Trump’s 2024 announcement as it negated their election fraud beliefs.
Q-aligned candidates did badly at the midterms, and recent “Q drops” failed to make a stir.
But experts told Insider why the movement is as strong as ever.

When former President Donald Trump announced that he was planning to run for president in 2024, there was confusion and anger in the extremist QAnon community.

The QAnon conspiracy movement, which is based around the belief that Trump is secretly working to expose a cabal of Satan-worshiping pedophiles that run the world, has in recent years grown to become a part of mainstream politics.

While many QAnon believers reacted to his long-anticipated announcement with excitement, some voiced their anger, because it implied he was accepting that he lost the 2020 election – something he and his most ardent supporters have spent the last two years rejecting.

“Hey you guys, the elections are all rigged… But [vote] for me again! This is literally 1984-tier doublethink,” one user wrote on 8kun, according to screenshots posted on Twitter.

“He just conceded 2020 election we’re just gonna skip over the 2020 and 2022 fraud,” another user wrote on Telegram. “There’s no justice for treason, there’s no justice for crimes against humanity.”

—Kurt Eichenwald (@kurteichenwald) November 16, 2022

—2022 Karma 🌻🌻 (@2022_Karma) November 16, 2022

 

The QAnon movement was already on the back foot. The midterm elections were a failure for the conspiracy theory movement, as dozens of candidates aligned with it lost their races for Congress and high-ranking state offices.

And earlier this month, the latest posts by the so-called “Q” on the forum 8kun were met with a lukewarm response.

All of this could be taken as evidence that the movement is losing steam. However, experts believe this is far from the case – and that it is simply evolving and changing shape. 

“It’s becoming much more mainstream and less devoted to the mythology of Q itself,” Mike Rothschild, a QAnon expert who wrote “The Storm is Upon Us,” told Insider.

“It certainly still venerates Trump, but a lot of people think Q itself was just a big dead end. The mainstream has embraced the conspiracy theories about the stolen election, COVID being a hoax, etcetera.”

One in five Americans …read more

Source:: Business Insider

      

Some QAnon believers are enraged by Trump’s 2024 announcement and have started ignoring ‘Q drops.’ But experts say the movement is as fervent as ever.

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