How Eric Hosmer’s Contract Could Affect Red Sox’s J.D. Martinez Pursuit

Boston Red Sox owner John Henry on Monday wasn’t in the mood to talk about his team’s pursuit of free agent slugger J.D. Martinez, but that doesn’t me we can’t.

And after a historically offseason, perhaps we’re finally inching closer to getting some sort of resolution. A huge offseason domino fell Saturday night in the form of Eric Hosmer, who reportedly agreed to an eight-year, $144 million contract with the San Diego Padres.

What does that mean for the Red Sox and their reported pursuit for Martinez?

It’s certainly interesting to note both Hosmer and Martinez are represented by Scott Boras. Everyone knows Boras and his clients are willing to hold out as long as possible for the best possible deal, but spring training is underway. The season is near. Guys want to get back to work.

Will Martinez come to a similar realization, even if it maybe means “settling” for something a little less than he and Boras originally demanded?

Could be, and according to ESPN’s Buster Olney, there’s a feeling Martinez will follow the lead of Hosmer and other Boras clients by signing soon.

Scott Boras represents a big portion of the unsigned players, and clients Tony Watson and Eric Hosmer reached agreements the last 48 hours. Expectation among some evaluators is that slugger J.D. Martinez, another Boras client, will pick his next home soon.

— Buster Olney (@Buster_ESPN) February 18, 2018

As for Martinez’s contract, it’s interesting to note the average annual value of Hosmer’s contract is $18 million — coming in below most projections entering the offseason.

MLB Trade Rumors: 6 years, $132 million ($22 million AAV)
MLB.com: 7 years, $140 million ($20 million AAV)
Fangraphs: 6 years, $126 million ($21 million AAV)

Hosmer’s actual contract: 8 years, $144 million

It’s important to note the contract’s structure, too: According to reports, Hosmer’s deal is front-loaded, meaning he’ll make $20 million per season for the first five years of the contract. He can opt out after the fifth season, and if he doesn’t, he makes $13 million over the final three seasons (he also reportedly got a $5 million signing bonus). It’s almost like two separate deals, and it all keeps the AAV below what most forecasted Hosmer to receive.

And maybe that’s how the Red Sox and Camp Martinez find some middle ground, striking a similar deal that will allow Martinez to get a good chunk of his money up front. …read more

Source:: NESN.com – MLB

      

MLB Announces Rule Changes For 2018 Season To Improve Pace Of Play

Major League Baseball will not implement a pitch clock for the 2018 season. However, MLB announced Monday that there will be rule changes designed to improve the pace of play.

Here’s the complete release, per MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand:

Here is MLB’s entire release on pace of play rule changes: pic.twitter.com/3PR47eGmZ0

— Mark Feinsand (@Feinsand) February 19, 2018

Rule change No. 1 for 2018 on mound visits: pic.twitter.com/ZtsFbmoYTN

— Mark Feinsand (@Feinsand) February 19, 2018

Rule change No. 2 for 2018 on inning breaks and pitching changes: pic.twitter.com/0MCvEnvVbl

— Mark Feinsand (@Feinsand) February 19, 2018

Rule change (or non-change) No. 3 and 4 for 2018 on the batter’s box rule and video replay: pic.twitter.com/02dJFWBxzH

— Mark Feinsand (@Feinsand) February 19, 2018

Basically, MLB is limiting the number of non-pitching change mound visits (six per team, per nine innings — and one additional visit per team, per inning for any extra-inning games) while also trying to reduce the time required for inning breaks and pitching changes.

We’ll see if this results in any noticeable difference, but it’s at least a step toward speeding up games, which lasted an average of three hours, eight minutes during the 2017 season, according to Baseball-Reference.

…read more

Source:: NESN.com – MLB

      

MLB pace of play initiatives for 2018 won’t include pitch clock

MLB has announced pace of play initiatives that will be implemented this season, including a limit on mound visits among other changes. A pitch clock will not be put in place this season, with commissioner Rob Manfred deciding to defer its “in order to provide players with an opportunity to speed up the game without the use of those timers,” according to a press release.

More to come.

…read more

Source:: Sportsnet.ca – Sports news