Luis Suarez Cleared to Make Barcelona Return After Knee Injury

Barcelona striker Luis Suarez has been given the green light to return to action after successfully completing his recovery from knee surgery.

The Uruguay international went under the knife in January but has now been given the all-clear by the club’s medical department in an official statement.

“Luis Suárez is ready to return. 147 days after having surgery the Uruguayan striker has received the all clear from the Club’s medical services and is available for selection as Barça get ready for the return to action on 13 June at 10pm CEST away at Mallorca.”

The striker’s return will be a big boost for Barcelona ahead of the run-in. The 33-year-old had scored in 14 goals in 23 games for the Catalan giants before he was forced on to the sidelines.

He also remains the third-highest goalscorer in La Liga despite having only played once in the competition in 2020 because of his injury. Only team-mate Lionel Messi and Real Madrid’s Karim Benzema have more league goals so far in this campaign.

Suarez Ready for the Run-In

Suarez has worked hard to return to action and has looked in good shape on the training ground ahead of the resumption of La Liga.

🔫⚽ Looking good, Pistolero!

🔥 @LuisSuarez9 🔥 pic.twitter.com/HLudDg2NPe

— FC Barcelona (from 🏠) (@FCBarcelona) June 6, 2020

The Uruguay international has also spoken to the club’s media about how he is feeling about getting back out on the pitch.

“I feel very good, adapting to training with my team-mates. Returning after an injury is always difficult, because you are a little scared but I’m enjoying being back.”

Barcelona assistant coach Eder Sarabia told the club’s media in a video call during lockdown that having Suarez available again would be like having a “great signing from the lockdown window.”

Barcelona 11 Games Away From Another Title

The Catalan giants will resume their league campaign on top of the table and are just 11 games away from successfully defending their title.

Suarez is likely to go straight back into the starting XI for their first two games against Real Mallorca and Leganes. Both opponents will restart their La Liga campaign in the relegation zone.

The Uruguayan may fancy his chances of getting back on the scoresheet too. He was on target in the 5-2 win over …read more

Source:: Heavy.com

      

Almost 600 US healthcare workers have died of COVID-19 and the majority of them are people of color

nurses coronavirus protest white house

Almost 600 US healthcare workers died of COVID-19 during the pandemic, according to a new database published by the Guardian and Kaiser Health News.
According to the project, called “Lost on the Frontline,” people of color make up the majority of COVID-19 deaths among healthcare workers.
The project is a comprehensive count of COVID-19 deaths in the industry, tracking factors including race and ethnicity, locations, age, and whether the workers had access to personal protective equipment.
The full, updated database is set to be fully released in the summer to offer insight into the workings — and failures — of the US healthcare system during the coronavirus pandemic.
Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Almost 600 healthcare workers in the US have died of COVID-19, with a majority being people of color according to a project launched by the Guardian and Kaiser Health News.

The number accounts for doctors, nurses, and paramedics, but also includes other essential healthcare staff such as hospital janitors, administrators, and nursing home workers.

The project called “Lost on the Frontline” aims to “count, verify, and memorialize” every US healthcare worker who died during the pandemic.

It consists of an extensive, interactive, and updated database that will track factors including race and ethnicity, age, profession, location, and whether the workers had access to personal protective equipment (PPE)or not.

Of the numbers they have recorded so far, the Guardian and KHN found that people of color made up the majority of the healthcare workers who died from COVID-19. Most of them are either African American or Asian/Pacific Islanders.

The database is the most comprehensive count of US health care workers’ deaths outside of The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which has only counted 368 coronavirus deaths in the industry so far but has admitted that the tally is an undercount.

Information about healthcare workers has been collected from a range of sources, including media reports, family and friends, unions, and colleagues of the deceased. The full database will be released this summer, offering insight into the workings — and failings — of the US healthcare system during the coronavirus outbreak.

The White House saw several demonstrations during the pandemic by healthcare workers pushing for adequate (PPE). Nurses in New York have also filed three lawsuits that allege “grossly inadequate and negligent protections.”

“Don’t call me a hero,” one New York City nurse told Business Insider. “Instead, show …read more

Source:: Business Insider

      

Quibi insiders describe what it’s like working on shows for the video startup, which raised $1.8 billion and has become a media punching bag after a sluggish launch

Survive Quibi

Quibi’s sluggish growth since its April debut has made it the butt of some media jokes: “Yes, Quibi still exists,” cracked the headline of a June Marketplace episode.
Business Insider got the inside story of how people who have developed or worked on shows for Quibi feel about the service post-launch.
Most of the people said it showed promise and was producing high-quality programming, but were disappointed with the initial response.
“I genuinely thought it would do better,” one person said. “I’m not using it as much as I thought I would.”
The insiders also described a demanding workload on Quibi productions, which was intensified by the pandemic, as well as extensive notes from Quibi’s content execs, on everything from the graphics to the talent on screen.
If you have a tip about Quibi, contact the author at arodriguez@businessinsider.com, or message her on Signal at 347-770-5933.
Click here for more BI Prime stories.

Not long after the mobile-video service Quibi launched, its cofounder Jeffrey Katzenberg ruffled feathers with a quip to The New York Times that one of the company’s core bets was not panning out.

The startup, which had raised a mammoth $1.8 billion from venture backers, had hired publishers like BBC, ESPN, and E! to create short-form news and lifestyle programming. The slate, called Daily Essentials, aimed to help make Quibi a habit for its target audience of 20- and 30-somethings who spend their days glued to smartphones.

“The Daily Essentials are not that essential,” Katzenberg told the Times’ Nicole Sperling in early May. He also blamed the coronavirus pandemic for Quibi’s anemic growth since launch.

The remark didn’t sit well with some people who were actively working on Quibi’s Daily Essentials.

“It was disenchanting and concerning,” a development exec at one of Quibi’s content partners told Business Insider. “You’re talking about hundreds of people working on various Daily Essentials … It leads all of us to ask and wonder, what exactly the future is for the ‘essentials’?”

“What exactly is the future” is a fundamental question that plagues not just those working on the Daily Essentials, but other Quibi insiders, as well.

During May and June, Business Insider spoke with 10 people who had developed or worked on shows for Quibi, including four who were actively involved in productions at the time. The people asked to remain anonymous because they did not have permission to speak about Quibi’s productions.

The people described a demanding …read more

Source:: Business Insider

      

Opinion: The OPEC-Russia oil deal is only a tactical truce — not the end of conflict

The “historic” oil deal between OPEC and Russia concluded on April 12 — de facto joined by the U.S., Mexico and Canada — is unlikely to yield lasting change. Various adverse circumstances have left all the parties involved dissatisfied, and the core issues that led to the crisis remain unresolved. Read More …read more

Source:: Calgaryherald.com

      

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