10 things in tech you need to know today

Facebook Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg attends the annual Munich Security Conference in Germany, February 15, 2020. REUTERS/Andreas Gebert

Good morning! This is the tech news you need to know this Monday.

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg has indicated that big tech companies need more regulation. In an op-ed in the Financial Times, the tech giant’s boss suggested that the short term profit hit could be worth it in the long run.
Japanese gaming giant Nintendo could face supply shortages as a result of the coronavirus. Bloomberg reports that the company may struggle to supply Switch consoles to the US and Europe as soon as April.
Facebook canceled an annual San Francisco conference because of coronavirus concerns. Facebook’s canceled Global Marketing Summit also follows Barcelona’s canceled Mobile World Summit, a major tech conference that was slated for late-February.
Tesla has been forced to pause plans for a Gigafactory in Germany following a court injunction. Environmentalists won the injunction against the electric car maker Sunday in a bid to prevent the company’s first European car factory.
Amazon’s Ring, a doorbell and security company, has not had a meaningful impact on criminal resolution. Despite partnering with more than 800 law enforcement agencies in the US, NBC reports that few departments have made arrests using the company’s videos.
‘Sonic the Hedgehog’ had the biggest opening weekend ever for a video game movie with $57 million. The movie performed higher than the studio’s projection of $40 million, beating Pokémon Detective Pikachu.
A cyber group warned ‘everything is hackable’ after hacking the Olympics and FC Barcelona Twitter accounts and posting about private messages. OurMine, the group responsible for several prominent Twitter hacks beginning in 2016 claimed responsibility.
Facebook has changed its ad rules to allow paid political messages including memes. The policy shift comes after he Democratic presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg exploited a loophole at the tech giant by posting humorous messages from popular meme accounts.
A new report found that Iranian hackers have been infiltrating VPN servers to create backdoors. Iranian hackers have targeted Pulse Secure, Fortinet, Palo Alto Networks, and Citrix VPNs to hack into large companies, according to ZDNet.
A new Twitter filter deletes naked pictures from messages to help users avoid unsolicited naked pictures. The plug in “safe DM” was developed by Kelsey Bressler after she received an unwanted nude picture from a man.

Have an Amazon Alexa device? Now you can hear 10 Things in Tech each morning. Just search for “Business Insider” in your …read more

Source:: Business Insider

      

Passenger Confirmed to Have Coronavirus After Leaving Cruise Ship That Docked in Cambodia

A passenger on a cruise ship that was denied entry from several countries amid concerns about the spread of a deadly coronavirus was confirmed to be infected with the novel coronavirus after she and her husband disembarked when the ship was allowed to dock in Cambodia.

The confirmation of an infection on the ship has raised concerns about the virus’ further spread, and authorities are scrambling to confirm if other passengers might be infected, potentially spreading the virus to countries it has not yet reached.

The 83-year-old American woman, who had been on board the Holland America Line ship the Westerdam, was stopped at the Kuala Lumpur airport in Malaysia after going through thermal temperature scanners, and later tested positive for the coronavirus, officially named called COVID-19, according to the Malaysian Deputy Prime Minister Wan Azizah Wan Ismail.

Her 85-year-old husband, who is also an American citizen, has been tested twice for the virus, but the results were negative.

Japan, the Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand, and the U.S. territory of Guam had all denied the ship’s entry, on concerns over the outbreak, despite repeated statements from cruise officials that there were no known cases of the virus on board, before Cambodia agreed to allow the ship to dock.

Hundreds of other passengers have also left the ship, and they are heading to destinations on several different continents. A 66-year-old passenger from Australia, Ann-Maree Melling, tells TIME that after leaving the Westerdam, she and her husband stayed in Phnom Penh in Cambodia before flying to Bali, where they are now vacationing. The couple’s flight had a stopover in Singapore.

“We are in close coordination with some of the leading health experts from around the world,” said Dr. Grant Tarling, Chief Medical Officer for Holland America Line said in a post on its blog. “These experts are working with the appropriate national health authorities to investigate and follow-up with individuals who may have come in contact with the guest.

Melling said that she and her husband plan to check in with their doctor when they get home later this month. “We both feel it would be irresponsible not to,” she said.

It is unclear when or where the infected woman caught the virus, which has sickened more than 70,000 people in 25 countries and killed 1,775. The cruise line issued a statement saying that the woman did not appear sick while on …read more

Source:: Time – Health

      

Passenger Confirmed to Have Coronavirus After Leaving Cruise Ship That Docked in Cambodia

A passenger on a cruise ship that was denied entry from several countries amid concerns about the spread of a deadly coronavirus was confirmed to be infected with the novel coronavirus after she and her husband disembarked when the ship was allowed to dock in Cambodia.

The confirmation of an infection on the ship has raised concerns about the virus’ further spread, and authorities are scrambling to confirm if other passengers might be infected, potentially spreading the virus to countries it has not yet reached.

The 83-year-old American woman, who had been on board the Holland America Line ship the Westerdam, was stopped at the Kuala Lumpur airport in Malaysia after going through thermal temperature scanners, and later tested positive for the coronavirus, officially named called COVID-19, according to the Malaysian Deputy Prime Minister Wan Azizah Wan Ismail.

Her 85-year-old husband, who is also an American citizen, has been tested twice for the virus, but the results were negative.

Japan, the Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand, and the U.S. territory of Guam had all denied the ship’s entry, on concerns over the outbreak, despite repeated statements from cruise officials that there were no known cases of the virus on board, before Cambodia agreed to allow the ship to dock.

Hundreds of other passengers have also left the ship, and they are heading to destinations on several different continents. A 66-year-old passenger from Australia, Ann-Maree Melling, tells TIME that after leaving the Westerdam, she and her husband stayed in Phnom Penh in Cambodia before flying to Bali, where they are now vacationing. The couple’s flight had a stopover in Singapore.

“We are in close coordination with some of the leading health experts from around the world,” said Dr. Grant Tarling, Chief Medical Officer for Holland America Line said in a post on its blog. “These experts are working with the appropriate national health authorities to investigate and follow-up with individuals who may have come in contact with the guest.

Melling said that she and her husband plan to check in with their doctor when they get home later this month. “We both feel it would be irresponsible not to,” she said.

It is unclear when or where the infected woman caught the virus, which has sickened more than 70,000 people in 25 countries and killed 1,775. The cruise line issued a statement saying that the woman did not appear sick while on …read more

Source:: Time – World

      

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