Apple is expanding its new ‘Express’ stores for the iPhone 12 launch and holiday shopping — see what’s it’s like to shop at one

Apple Express store in Burlingame, California

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Apple will be unveiling new “Express” storefronts as the holiday shopping season approaches and the company begins to distribute its new iPhone 12 models, Reuters reported.

Like many retailers that have had to shift amid the coronavirus pandemic, the new “Express” format changes the classic layout of the Apple store by integrating a wall towards the storefront and using plexiglass on the sales counters to separate employees from customers.

The concept was first tested last month at the Burlingame, California location, Engadget reported. There are now around 20 Express stores in the US and Europe with plans to grow to 50 stores by the end of October, senior vice president of retail and people at Apple Deirdre O’Brien told Reuters.

Keep scrolling to see inside the stores:

See more: Now Apple wants to bulldoze the fitness app industry, even though many of these companies rely on the App Store and dutifully pay Apple its 30% cut

SEE ALSO: Sam’s Club will start using autonomous AI floor-scrubbing robots in all of its US stores during the coronavirus pandemic — see what the robots look like

There are shelves between the sales counters that showcase Apple products like iPhone cases and AirPods. However, like the counters, the accessories will be behind a panel.

Express store visitors have to make an appointment for customer service help or to pick up online orders.

According to the Reuters report, Apple has been careful with its brick and mortar locations throughout the pandemic.

Source: Reuters

This new layout could help the tech giant’s stores stay open if coronavirus infection rates continue to rise in the US.

It also serves as a COVID-19 friendly alternative to curbside pickup in locations where there are no curbs, such as malls, Reuters reported.

Source: Reuters

The expansion of the Express storefront is not the only precaution Apple is taking now that the iPhone 12 has been launched and potential holiday shopping crowds are right around the corner.

For example, instead of letting customers wait in the infamously long lines that often follow after new iPhone releases, Apple will be using an in-person reservation system that allows customers to book a visitation time and leave the lines if they become too long.

Source: Business Insider 

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Source:: Business Insider

      

‘Cult of Smart’ author Fredrik deBoer on the taboo of admitting some kids just aren’t good at school, why ‘equality of opportunity’ is bunk, and why he believes in a culture of forgiveness over cancellation

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Fredrik deBoer is an essayist, academic, and avowed Marxist who has contributed writing to outlets as varied as The New York Times, Politico, Gawker, Foreign Policy, The New Republic, and Jacobin. 

He’s also been a teacher at both the high school and college levels, and he just published his first book, “The Cult of Smart: How Our Broken Education System Perpetuates Social Injustice.” 

DeBoer’s publisher says “his anti-tribal style has earned him admiration from political thinkers of all quadrants,” to which I can relate.

Even — or perhaps, especially — when I vehemently disagree with deBoer, his fluidly conversational writing and thoughtful advocacy for left-wing causes has challenged my own beliefs, and at times helped make my own arguments stronger. 

I was delighted to talk with him this week from his home in Brooklyn (via Zoom) about the controversy surrounding the idea of inherited intelligence, why he thinks blaming teachers unions is a red herring, and why the concept of “equality of opportunity” is total bunk. 

This interview has been edited for style, length, and clarity.

You call this book “a prayer for the untalented.” What does that mean?

When both conservatives and liberals discuss a just society, they tend to use language like “everyone should get what they deserve” or “everyone should be able to maximize their own potential.” That they should not be held back by outside factors that we consider illegitimate, like how rich their parents are. My position in the book is, why do we stop there? 

In other words, if your natural talent is something that you have incomplete control over, then that’s no more of a natural or just reason to restrict someone from living the good life than anything else. I want us to peel back that onion one more level and look at those who just lack natural talent in things that happen to be marketable in today’s economy and ask, “Why should they suffer?”

You wrote that the conservative point of view is focused on grit. Something like, “grit will get you through hardship and toward success.” And you wrote that the liberal point of view is focused on opportunity and equity. 

In the book, you say sometimes it just doesn’t matter. Some kids just don’t have what it takes to succeed at school. Why do you think people can’t accept that? What makes it so controversial? 

Conservatives tend to really be invested in this notion of …read more

Source:: Business Insider

      

NASA just picked a winner in its space-toilet competition. The $20,000 prize awards the best ‘lunar loo’ for moon-bound astronauts.

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The last time astronauts landed on the moon, in December 1972, they wore glorified diapers.

NASA never designed a proper toilet for the Apollo missions. Instead, the astronauts — all of whom were men — peed into roll-on cuffs, pooped in bags, and used space diapers when they ventured out of the lander in their spacesuits.

NASA sent the first space toilet to the earliest US space station in 1973. The technology has improved since then, and the agency’s latest $23 million space-toilet system contains state-of-the-art fans that suction waste downward and provide odor control. 

But now that NASA is working to send astronauts back to the moon in 2024, it’s designing a new kind of toilet: one that can work both in orbit and on the lunar surface, where gravity is about one-sixth as strong as Earth’s. 

“We need a toilet that needs to work for seven days on the surface of the moon, as well as during that transit time to and from the moon,” Mike Interbartolo, who’s part of NASA’s lunar-lander engineering team, previously told Business Insider.

To accomplish that goal, the agency launched its “Lunar Loo” contest in June, in partnership with HeroX: a platform on which people can host contests, similar to the way fundraising efforts use Kickstarter. NASA invited engineers, designers, and space enthusiasts around the world to submit designs for moon-mission toilets.

All submissions had to work for male and female astronauts of varying heights and weights, and weigh less than 33 lbs (15 kg) in Earth’s gravity.

“Bonus points will be awarded to designs that can capture vomit without requiring the crew member to put his/her head in the toilet,” NASA’s guidelines said.

The contest received over 2,000 entries from around the world. On Thursday, NASA announced the winners. First place went to a team that designed a toilet they call the Translunar Hypercritical Repository 1 (THRONE). The team, led by Washington-based engineer Boone Davidson, based its design on advice from former astronaut Susan Helms.

That toilet won $20,000 in prize money, and the two runners up also got cash prizes. Here are the contest’s three winners.

The first-place winners sought guidance from a retired astronaut 

The team behind the winning THRONE design wanted to get an astronaut’s perspective, so they reached out to Susan Helms, who logged more than 5,000 hours in space before she retired from NASA.

Helms reportedly told the group that she …read more

Source:: Business Insider

      

Morgan Stanley’s WhatsApp woes – How to get hired at Blackstone — Private equity comp, revealed

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Happy Saturday!

It was a busy week for Wall Street news, with fines, exits, pay cuts, and more. Here’s what you need to know: 

2 top Morgan Stanley commodities execs have left after the bank discovered the group was improperly using WhatsApp to communicate. A source familiar with the matter told Business Insider the two had displayed a “failure to supervise use of the communications within the commodities business.”
Goldman Sachs is paying billions in fines over the 1MDB scandal and cutting exec pay. Here’s what’s been going on inside the bank.
JPMorgan is considering hiring as many as 4,000 financial advisors in the next five to six years, wealth boss Kristin Lemkau told Business Insider. The firm has already hired large teams of experienced FAs from rivals including Merrill Lynch and UBS in recent months.

Wells Fargo is exploring a sale of its asset management business, Reuters first reported. 

How to ace an interview at Blackstone

Reed Alexander and Casey Sullivan chatted with Blackstone President and COO Jon Gray, industry headhunters, and Blackstone’s global head of human resources to learn what it takes to stand out and get hired at the firm. Here are some of the highlights: 

There were 19,000 applications for Blackstone’s 2020 first-year analyst class, and just 94 were hired, according to data Blackstone shared.

“At a place like this, we have relatively few people. And we really need people who care,” Gray said.
“I look for too many references to ‘I’ versus ‘we,'” Paige Ross, Blackstone’s global head of HR, told Business Insider. “Most people do things as part of a team, and I want to see candidates accurately reflect that.”

You can read the full story here: Blackstone insiders reveal how to land a job at the ultra-competitive private-equity giant

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Inside the alumni network of billionaire Israel Englander

Millennium Management, the massive hedge-fund manager founded by the billionaire Israel Englander more than 30 years ago, has a sprawling web of alumni who have gone on to found their own firms. Bradley Saacks found that more than 70 former employees have launched their own funds across the globe.

You can see the full story, database, and graphic here. 

Private equity pay, revealed

While raises weren’t as common as they were a year ago, …read more

Source:: Business Insider